Provincial and Global


Art in Bruges takes all forms, from musical groups on the streets, to the requisite mimes, to installations of contemporary art and of course the art of the region in the museums.  This is a good example of a city that has invited international artists to “respond” to the environment of Bruges with installations throughout the city.  It is also a city whose museum is limited to artists who have had a relationship with the city hence, leaving out  Belgian artists who have created amazing works of art and concentrating on native sons and daughters whose work is completely derivative and not so interesting.  The not so primitive Flemish Primitives are of course the stars.  Not much of interest past the 15th century in the Groeninge Museum.

 

A Bach serenade in the Burg square.  Check out the lute on wheels.
A Bach serenade in the Burg square. Check out the lute on wheels, and an accordion playing Bach! Quite good.
A neon artist whose narrative single words and phrases appeared in interesting places.  Food for thought?
A neon artist whose narrative single words and phrases appeared in interesting places. Food for thought?
This odd shaped sculpture reflective on all sides in the center of the main square looks like one of the devices that was used to haul goods off the boats that would have moored there in the 15th century.
This odd shaped sculpture reflective on all sides in the center of the main square looks like one of the devices that was used to haul goods off the boats that would have moored there in the 15th century.
Doors and windows make an interesting installation next to the St Steven church.
Doors and windows make an interesting installation next to the St Steven church.

 

The exterior of the Groeninge Museum that exhibits work from the 15th to the 20th century.  There are 10 galleries so it's a relatively small venue though the collection is much larger.
The exterior of the Groeninge Museum that exhibits work from the 15th to the 20th century. There are 10 galleries so it’s a relatively small venue though the collection is much larger.
I wanted a better reproduction to share with you of this Hieronymus Bosch but could not find any other reference to it online.  It's a triptych of the "Trial of Job".
I wanted a better reproduction to share with you of this Hieronymus Bosch but could not find any other reference to it online. It’s a triptych of the “Trial of Job”.
IMG_3039
Detail of “Trial of Job” lower left hand corner. Has the definite imagery of a Bosch fantasy.
Jan van Eyck’s “Virgin and Child with Canon Joris van der Paele” from 1436 is hardly “primitive”. It’s a spectacular image of luminous painting and incredible gem like details. A link for closer examination is attached.
van_der_weyden_st-luke-drawing-the-virgin2-resized-600.jpg
Rogier van der Weyden, Luke Drawing the Virgin from 1435 can be seen in our textbook for Northern European Renaissance. Luke was presumed to be an artist in his own right and is naturally the patron saint of artists. Notice the city of Bruges out the window.
Last but not least is van Eyck’s portrait of his wife Margareta (1439) one of the first non religious portraits and a good match for van Eyck’s self portrait (the man in the red turban). If you saw it in reality you’d be amazed at how well van Eyck is able to portrait cloth, velvet, and fur. So much for “primitive artists”.
Getting closer to modern times were some small etchings by James Ensor of the Virtues and Vices.  Just like we guessed about the Breughels in class which one is this?
Getting closer to modern times were some small etchings by James Ensor of the Virtues and Vices. Just like we guessed about the Breughels in class which one is this?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s